Cholla Wood - Planted Tank Mates

Cholla Wood

12” | Bottom of Tank

Lowers PH | Anti-bacterial

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pronounced “cho-yah” wood

Characteristics:

Max Size: 4-12″

Composition: Bottom of Tank

Uses

Reduces PH

Provides grazing area for shrimp

Tank Mates

Shrimps love grazing on this!  It’s also a natural way to soften water and bring down PH.

Notes

Cholla wood is actually a dried out cactus that’s perforated and hollow.  It can release tannins and turn the water murky yellow, but the tannins are filled with anti-bacterial and anti-fungal properties which are good for shrimp.  Shrimp also love grazing and hiding it it, so it’s a winning additive for your tank.  Pre-soak it for a few days so it’ll sink to the bottom of your aquarium.

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Cholla Wood removeRed Cherry Shrimp removeOdessa Barb removeCrystal Red Shrimp removeClown Killifish removeAura Blue Tiger Shrimp remove
NameCholla Wood removeRed Cherry Shrimp removeOdessa Barb removeCrystal Red Shrimp removeClown Killifish removeAura Blue Tiger Shrimp remove
Imagecholla wood lowers phred cherry shrimpOdessa barb fish (Pethia padamy).crystal red shrimpClown killifish (Epiplatys annulatus).aura blue tiger shrimp
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Description

12” | Bottom of Tank

Lowers PH | Anti-bacterial

1.5" | TDS 150-220

PH 7-7.6 | KH 2-8

3" | 5 or more | 30 gal

PH 6-8 | Aggressive

1.5" | TDS 120-160

PH 6.2-6.9 | KH 0-2

1.5" | 1-3 group | 5 gal

PH 6-7.5 | Peaceful

1.5" | TDS 130-180

PH 6.2-6.9 | KH 0-2

Content

pronounced "cho-yah" wood

Characteristics:

Max Size: 4-12"

Composition: Bottom of Tank

Uses

Reduces PH

Provides grazing area for shrimp

Tank Mates

Shrimps love grazing on this!  It's also a natural way to soften water and bring down PH.

Notes

Cholla wood is actually a dried out cactus that's perforated and hollow.  It can release tannins and turn the water murky yellow, but the tannins are filled with anti-bacterial and anti-fungal properties which are good for shrimp.  Shrimp also love grazing and hiding it it, so it's a winning additive for your tank.  Pre-soak it for a few days so it'll sink to the bottom of your aquarium.

Neocaridina davidi

Characteristics:

Max Size: 1.5″

Care Level: Easy

Behavior: Peaceful

Diet: Omnivore

Water Movement: Slow Moving

Parameters

Temperature: 68 - 74

PH: 7 - 7.6

dGH: 6 - 12

dKH: 2 - 8

TDS: 150-220

Tank Size: 10 gal

Tank Mates

Tetras, Danios, Kuhli Loaches, Corydoras,  Otocinclus and other small nano fish.  There's always a risk that baby shrimp can get eaten.  Avoid aggressive or large mouth fish.

Care

Provide a variety of hiding places.  Shrimp will molt and prefer places to hide while their new body is tender.  Keep the molted shells in the tank as other shrimp will feed off it as a good source of calcium.  Unlike Caridina shrimp, Neocaridina are hardy and very easy to keep.  Always remove dead shrimp to minimize bacteria and infections.  Avoid heavy c02 injection.

See this blog article for general Cherry Shrimp breeding and mixing colors

Pethia padamya

Characteristics:

Max Size: 3″

Care Level: Easy

Behavior: Semi-Aggressive

Dwelling: Middle of tank

Diet: Omnivore

Water Movement: Slow Moving

Parameters

Temperature: 72 - 82

PH: 6 – 8

dGH: 3 - 10

dKH: 4 – 10

Tank Size: 30 gal

Grouping: 5 or more

Tank Mates

 Cories, Loaches, Platies and Rad-tailed sharks.  Avoid Bettas, Guppies, Gouramis and small snails.

Notes

The Odessa Barb can be aggressive with other Odessas in the same tank, particularly the males exerting dominance.  They may also nip at slower moving fish or fish with long-flowing fins, such as Guppies, Angelfish, Betta fish, Goldfish, Gourami and small snails.

Caridina Cantonensis

Characteristics:

Max Size: 1.5″

Care Level: Expert

Behavior: Peaceful

Diet: Omnivore

Water Movement: Slow Moving

Parameters

Temperature: 68 - 74

PH: 6.2 - 6.9

dGH: 4 - 6

dKH: 0 - 2

TDS: 120-160

Tank Size: 10 gal

Tank Mates

Tetras, Danios, Kuhli Loaches, Corydoras,  Otocinclus and other small nano fish.  There's always a risk that baby shrimp can get eaten.  Some recommend Caridina to be in species only tanks.  Avoid aggressive or large mouth fish.

Notes

Stability is key.  Caridina shrimp are very sensitive to water changes prefer softer and acid waters.  Keep cooler water temperatures and avoid heavy c02 injection.  Minimize changes.

Provide a variety of hiding places.  Shrimp will molt and prefer places to hide while their new body is tender.  Keep the molted shells in the tank as other shrimp will feed off it as a good source of calcium.   Always remove dead shrimp to minimize bacteria and infections. Available on Amazon

Epiplatys annulatus

Characteristics:

Max Size: 1.5″

Care Level: Easy

Behavior: Peaceful

Dwelling: Top of tank

Diet: Omnivore

Water Movement: Slow Moving

Parameters

Temperature: 68° – 79°

PH: 6 - 7.5

dGH: 8 - 16

dKH: 4 - 8

Min Tank Size: 5 gal

Grouping: 1-3

Tank Mates

Tetras, Rasboras, Danios, Hatchetfish, Mollies, Dwarf Gourami, Angelfish, Guppies, Loaches, Corydoras, Plecos and Otocinclus.

Adult shrimps are generally safe.

Notes

Although they're top dwellers, they can be shy and do best in large groups. You can keep 1-5 of of these tiny guys in a 5 gallon tank, but provide 10 gallons or larger if keeping in a community with other fish. They're predators and like to wait at the top to grab their food. Killifish often prefer live foods over frozen foods and pellets. Avoid aggressive or territorial species or large fish with big mouths such as cichlids.d pellets.   Since they are colorful top dwellers, bettas may see them as competition and show aggression.

Caridina mariae, Caridina Cantonensis

Characteristics:

Max Size: 1.5″

Care Level: Expert

Behavior: Peaceful

Diet: Omnivore

Water Movement: Slow Moving

Parameters

Temperature: 68 - 74

PH: 6.5 - 6.9

dGH: 4 - 8

dKH: 0 - 2

TDS: 130-180

Tank Size: 10 gal

Tank Mates

Tetras, Danios, Kuhli Loaches, Corydoras,  Otocinclus and other small nano fish.  There's always a risk that baby shrimp can get eaten.  Avoid aggressive or large mouth fish.

Notes

Blue tiger shrimp do not breed true, meaning they may come out blonde or a lighter variance color.  Keep cooler water temperatures and avoid heavy c02 injection.  Minimize changes.

Provide a variety of hiding places.  Shrimp will molt and prefer places to hide while their new body is tender.  Keep the molted shells in the tank as other shrimp will feed off it as a good source of calcium.   Always remove dead shrimp to minimize bacteria and infections.
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